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Matriarchy: Anyone use dried chickpeas for hummus? I have always used canned, but dried are cheaper, and lighter to store in the pantry. I can dump a few bags in a jar. I found a recipe that said 3/4 cup of dried would cook up into the equivalent of a 15-oz can. I boiled them for two minutes in a lot of water, then let them soak overnight, then cooked them for half an hour the next day. But when I used the cooled peas to make hummus with my usual recipe, it was decidedly grainier than usual. Tasty, but not so creamy and smooth. Anyone know what I did wrong? Should I cook them longer? Is there just a fundamental difference between dried and canned? We go through more than a quart of hummus each month, so I really want to perfect my recipe, and be able to make it from my pantry at will. Hummus
7 years ago
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Eunice : Matriarchy, by grainy do you mean it's a harder, crunchier texture than you like? brining with salt should help as contrary to popular myth, it does help in breaking down the cellulose walls of the bean, making the texture softer. it does such a great job of breaking them down, that if you want whole beans, this is not the way to go as it just might disintegrate your beans. vinegar, or anything acidic, is one ingredient that will harden the bean. baking soda, as it's alkaline as opposed to acidic, causes the opposite reaction and makes the beans more soluble. but baking soda supposedly removes precious nutrients so... if you have hard water, that makes for a harder bean. also, the older the beans are, the longer it will take to cook them, so you will have to test them yourself and cook it to the texture that you want it. half an hour of cooking seems too little for your beans. i've also heard of recipes that use pressure cooking to make beans and that that was the preferred method by many bean lovers. perhaps it'll just blast some smoothness into your beans! hope that helps, all my food science geekery.
7 years ago
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Eunice : ehhh...and here's a link to food science geekery: Tough beans: which cooking liquids slow softening the most. enjoy!
7 years ago
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Matriarchy: Wow. That was magnificent geekery! I do have hard water, and did not think of that factor. By "grainy," I mean that once ground up into hummus, the hummus is not as smooth as that I make from canned chickpeas. I ran it through the food processor much longer than normal, and it didn't get less grainy. It tastes good, and we are eating it, but we all liked the smoother texture better. I just bought a fresh bag of chickpeas, to make sure they are not just old. This time, I am going to just cook them longer, and see if that was the problem. Then, I will grind them with some cooking liquid and see what kind of texture I get, before I add the rest of the more expensive ingredients (tahini, good olive oil, etc).
7 years ago

Matriarchy

Member since Sep 2007

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